Solar Eclipse?

Solar Eclipse?

Melissa showed this too me, she got it in an e-mail and I don’t know if its true or not. Read it and tell me what you think.

–Socram

“Reminder: Solar Eclipse: April 8, 2005

NASA Science News for April 1, 2005

On April 8th in North America crescent-shaped sunbeams will dapple the
ground during a partial solar eclipse.

People in southern parts of the USA, all of Mexico and much of South America
will experience a partial eclipse.

The sky won’t grow dark. Birds won’t stop singing. And the corona won’t make
an appearance. During a partial eclipse of the sun, the moon covers only a
fraction of the solar disk, taking a curved “bite” out of our star. The sun
remains glaring-bright. If you don’t know it’s happening, you might not even
notice.
But there is something to see: the shadows.

Look under a tree. Sunlight beaming through gaps in the leaves make
crescent-shaped spots on the ground. Look around the walls of your home or office.
You might see crescents projected by slits in the window shades. Windows with
cut glass are even better. Their prism-sharp corners bend sunlight and cast
rainbow-colored crescents in unexpected places. It’s like a treasure hunt.

You can make your own crescents. Lay your left hand on top of your right
hand, criss-crossing your fingers waffle-style; hold your hands so that sunlight
can beam through the gaps. You’ll see a pretty matrix of crescents on the
ground. Have you ever made a turkey or a rabbit using hand-shadows? Try it
during a partial eclipse; the animal’s eye will be crescent-shaped.

Partial eclipses last for more than an hour, so there’s plenty of time to
play.

The partial phase of this eclipse happens in North America between about
5:30 and 7:00 p.m. EDT For many people, this corresponds to sunset. Crescent
sunsets are pretty, but be careful. Even when the sun is hanging low and dimmed
by clouds, it is still dangerous to look at. A brief glimpse through a
telescope or binoculars can blind you. Try projecting an image of the sun instead

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/01apr_solareclipse.htm?list775641

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